Original Research

Parenting practices and family relationships during the COVID-19 lockdown in Ghana

Samuel A. Owusu, Bernard Ekumah, Ruby V. Kodom, Nancy I. Ebu Enyan, Irene Korkoi Aboh, Reginald Quansah, Sheila A. Boamah, Godfred O. Boateng, Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah, David T. Doku, Epaphrodite Nsabimana, Stefan Jansen, Frederick A. Armah
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 13, No 2 | a454 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2022.1849 | © 2024 Samuel A. Owusu, Bernard Ekumah, Ruby V. Kodom, Nancy I. Ebu Enyan, Irene Korkoi Aboh, Reginald Quansah, Sheila A. Boamah, Godfred O. Boateng, Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah, David T. Doku, Epaphrodite Nsabimana, Stefan Jansen, Frederick A. Armah | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 11 April 2024 | Published: 26 July 2022

About the author(s)

Samuel A. Owusu, Directorate of Research, Innovation and Consultancy, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Bernard Ekumah, Department of Environmental Science, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Ruby V. Kodom, Department of Public Administration and Health Services, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana
Nancy I. Ebu Enyan, Department of Adult Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Irene Korkoi Aboh, Department of Adult Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Reginald Quansah, Biological, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Ghana, Legon-Accra, Ghana
Sheila A. Boamah, School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
Godfred O. Boateng, Global and Environmental Health Lab, Department of Kinesiology, College of Nursing and Health Innovation, University of Texas, Arlington, United States
Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah, Directorate of Research, Innovation and Consultancy, University of Cape Coast, Ghana; and, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
David T. Doku, Directorate of Research, Innovation and Consultancy, University of Cape Coast, Ghana; and, Department of Population and Health, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Epaphrodite Nsabimana, Mental Health and Behavior Research Group, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Stefan Jansen, Mental Health and Behavior Research Group, College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
Frederick A. Armah, Directorate of Research, Innovation and Consultancy, University of Cape Coast, Ghana; and, Department of Environmental Science, University of Cape Coast, Ghana

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Abstract

The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic have been far reaching across almost every sphere of life. Families, which are the basic units of society, have not been spared the ravages of the pandemic. Changes in family daily routines as a result of COVID-19 can affect spousal relationships, parenting and childcare practices. However, the extent to which the pandemic has affected parenting practices and family relationships in Ghana is not known. The goal of this study was to assess how parenting practices and family relationships have been influenced during the COVID-19 pandemic in Ghana. Data for this paper was drawn from an online questionnaire response from 463 participants in Ghana as a subset analysis from a multi-country study on personal and family coping system with COVID-19 pandemic in the global south. The mean score for pre-COVID-19 relationship with partner (36.86) was higher (p<0.0001) than the mean score for during COVID-19 relationship with partner (35.32) indicating that COVID-19 has had negative influence on relationships. The mean score for pre-COVID-19 parenting (32.78) was higher (p<0.0001) compared to the mean score for during COVID-19 parenting (31.40) indicating negative influence on parenting. We have predicted that participants whose coping levels were “Well” on the average, are likely to be doing well in relationship with partners and parenting practices during the COVID-19 period The challenging public health containment measures of the COVID-19 pandemic have negatively influenced the relationship between partners and parenting practices in Ghana.


Keywords

Parenting; practices; relationships; COVID-19; Ghana

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