High seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the capital of Chad


Submitted: 24 June 2022
Accepted: 13 July 2022
Published: 11 January 2023
Abstract Views: 510
PDF: 86
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Authors

  • Andrillene Laure Deutou Wondeu Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad; Lab. of Molecular Biology, Immunopathology, Evangelical University of Cameroon, Mbouo-Bandjoun, Cameroon; Dept. of Biology and Interdepartmental Centre for Comparative Medicine, University Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
  • Fatima Abdelrazakh Livestock Research Institute for Development "IRED", N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Mahamat Fayiz Abakar Livestock Research Institute for Development "IRED", N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Fissou Henry Yandai Livestock Research Institute for Development "IRED", N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Aleyo Zita Nodjikouambaye Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Djallaye Djimtoibaye Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Pidou Kimala Livestock Research Institute for Development "IRED", N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Noel Nadjiadjim National Coordination for a COVID-19 Response, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Nathan Naïbeï Community of Friends of Computing for Development "CAID-Tchad", `N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Guy Rodrigue Takoudjou Dzomo Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Sabrina Atturo Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Giulia Linardos Virology and Mycobacteriology Unit, "Bambino Gesù" Children Hospital, Healthcare and Research Institute, Rome, Italy.
  • Cristina Russo Virology and Mycobacteriology Unit, "Bambino Gesù" Children Hospital, Healthcare and Research Institute, Rome; Multimodal Medicine "Bambino Gesù" Children Hospital - Healthcare and Research Institute, Rome, Italy.
  • Carlo Federico Perno Multimodal Medicine "Bambino Gesù" Children Hospital - Healthcare and Research Institute, Rome, Italy.
  • Ali Mahamat Moussa National Coordination for a COVID-19 Response, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Allarangar Yokouide National Coordination for a COVID-19 Response, N'Djamena, Chad.
  • Hyppolite Kuekou Tchidjou Pediatric Infectious Diseases, University Hospital, Amiens, France.
  • Vittorio Colizzi Major Tropical Epidemics Laboratory LAGET, Good Samaritan University Hospital Centre, N'Djamena, Chad; Lab. of Molecular Biology, Immunopathology, Evangelical University of Cameroon, Mbouo-Bandjoun, Cameroon; Dept. of Biology and Interdepartmental Centre for Comparative Medicine, University Tor Vergata, Rome, Italy.
  • Ouchemi Choua National Coordination for a COVID-19 Response, N'Djamena, Chad.

Background. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Chad has had 7,417 confirmed cases and 193 deaths, one of the lowest in Africa.
Objective. This study assessed SARS-CoV-2 immunity in N’Djamena.
Methods. In August-October 2021, eleven N’Djamena hospitals collected outpatient data and samples. IgG antibodies against SARSCoV- 2 nucleocapsid protein were identified using ELISA. “Bambino Gesù” Laboratory, Rome, Italy, performed external quality control with chemiluminescence assay.
Results. 25-34-year-old (35.2%) made up the largest age group at 31.9 12.6 years. 56.4% were women, 1.3 women/men. The 7th district had 22.5% and the 1st 22.3%. Housewives and students dominated. Overall seroprevalence was 69.5% (95% CI: 67.7-71.3), females 68.2% (65.8-70.5) and males 71.2% (68.6-73.8). >44-year-old had 73.9% seroprevalence. Under-15s were 57.4% positive. Housewives (70.9%), civil servants (71.5%), and health workers (9.7%) had the highest antibody positivity. N’Djamena’s 9th district had 73.1% optimism and the 3rd district had 52.5%. Seroprevalences were highest at Good Samaritan Hospital (75.4%) and National General Referral Hospital (74.7%).
Conclusion. Our findings indicate a high circulation of SARSCoV- 2 in N’Djamena, despite low mortality and morbidity after the first two COVID-19 pandemic waves. This high seroprevalence must be considered in Chad’s vaccine policy.


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Deutou Wondeu, A. L., Abdelrazakh, F., Abakar, M. F., Yandai, F. H., Nodjikouambaye, A. Z., Djimtoibaye, D., Kimala, P., Nadjiadjim, N., Naïbeï, N., Takoudjou Dzomo, G. R., Atturo, S., Linardos, G., Russo, C., Perno, C. F., Moussa, A. M., Yokouide, A., Tchidjou, H. K., Colizzi, V., & Choua, O. (2023). High seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the capital of Chad. Journal of Public Health in Africa, 13(4). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2022.2255

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