Trends of and factors associated with cesarean section related surgical site infections in Guinea

Authors

  • Alexandre Delamou Woman and Child Health Research Centre, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Public Health, Gamal University of Conakry, Guinea; Centre National de Formation et de Recherche en Santé Rurale de Maferinyah, Maferinyah
  • Bienvenu Salim Camara Centre National de Formation et de Recherche en Santé Rurale de Maferinyah, Maferinyah
  • Sidikiba Sidibé Woman and Child Health Research Centre, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium; Department of Public Health, Gamal University of Conakry, Guinea; Centre National de Formation et de Recherche en Santé Rurale de Maferinyah, Maferinyah
  • Alioune Camara Department of Public Health, Gamal University of Conakry, Conakry
  • Nafissatou Dioubaté Centre National de Formation et de Recherche en Santé Rurale de Maferinyah, Maferinyah
  • Alison Marie El Ayadi University of California, Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, San Francisco, CA
  • Katy Tayler-Smith Médecins sans Frontières, Medical Department, Operational Centre Brussels, MSF Luxembourg
  • Abdoul Habib Beavogui Centre National de Formation et de Recherche en Santé Rurale de Maferinyah, Maferinyah
  • Mamadou Dioulde Baldé Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Gamal University of Conakry, Conakry
  • Rony Zachariah Médecins sans Frontières, Medical Department, Operational Centre Brussels, MSF Luxembourg

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2019.818

Keywords:

Surgical site Infection, Cesarean section, Ebola virus disease, Guinea

Abstract

Since the adoption of free obstetric care policy in Guinea in 2011, no study has examined the surgical site infections in maternity facilities. The objective of this study was to assess the trends of and factors associated with surgical site infection following cesarean section in Guinean maternity facilities from 2013 to 2015. This was a retrospective cohort study using routine medical data from ten facilities. Overall, the incidence of surgical site infections following cesarean section showed a declining trend across the three periods (10% in 2013, 7% in 2014 and 5% in 2015, P<0.001). Women who underwent cesarean section in 2014 (AOR: 0.70; 95%CI: 0.57-0.84) and 2015 (AOR: 0.43; 95%CI: 0.34-0.55) were less likely to develop surgical site infections during hospital stay than women operated in 2013. In the contrary, women with comorbidities were more likely to experience surgical site infection (AOR: 1.54; 95% CI: 1.25-1.90) than those who did not have comorbidities. The reductions achieved in 2014 and 2015 (during the Ebola outbreak) should be sustained in the post-Ebola context.

Download data is not yet available.

Downloads

Published

03-05-2019

How to Cite

Delamou, A., Camara, B. S., Sidibé, S., Camara, A., Dioubaté, N., El Ayadi, A. M., Tayler-Smith, K., Beavogui, A. H., Baldé, M. D., & Zachariah, R. (2019). Trends of and factors associated with cesarean section related surgical site infections in Guinea. Journal of Public Health in Africa, 10(1). https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2019.818

Issue

Section

Original Articles