Original Research

Decrease on malaria clinical cases from 2017 to 2019 in Franceville, Southeast Gabon, Central Africa

Larson Boundenga, Michelle Bignoumba, Serge-Ely Dibakou, Landry E. Mombo, Clauve J. Moukagni-Mussadji, Dorothé M. Wora, Fabrice Kassa-Kassa, Cyrille Bisseye, Richard Onanga
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 14, No 3 | a223 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2023.1865 | © 2024 Larson Boundenga, Michelle Bignoumba, Serge-Ely Dibakou, Landry E. Mombo, Clauve J. Moukagni-Mussadji, Dorothé M. Wora, Fabrice Kassa-Kassa, Cyrille Bisseye, Richard Onanga | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 08 April 2024 | Published: 31 March 2023

About the author(s)

Larson Boundenga, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon; and, Department of Anthropology, University of Durham, United Kingdom
Michelle Bignoumba, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon
Serge-Ely Dibakou, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon
Landry E. Mombo, Cellular Biology (LABMC), Masuku University of Science and Technology, Franceville, Gabon
Clauve J. Moukagni-Mussadji, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon
Dorothé M. Wora, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon
Fabrice Kassa-Kassa, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon
Cyrille Bisseye, Cellular Biology (LABMC), Masuku University of Science and Technology, Franceville, Gabon
Richard Onanga, International Centre of Medical Research of Franceville (CIRMF), Franceville, Gabon

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Abstract

Background: In Gabon, malaria remains a major public health problem. All malaria cases with axillary temperature ≥ 37.5°C with a parasites density ≥ 1200/μL are serious cases and must be treated as a medical emergency. Thus, early diagnosis is essential for successful treatment. Because of the impact of malaria on the population, the surveillance of malaria infections in hospitals is urgently needed. The aim of this study was to to assess of clinical cases of malaria in a private health structure in Franceville between 2017 and 2019.

Methods: For that, we conducted a retrospective study using data on malaria cases recorded in a private medical analysis laboratory in Franceville, southeast Gabon. Malaria was diagnosed in this laboratory using a Rapid Diagnostic Test and confirmed by microscopic analysis.

Results: Analysis of 2518 patient forms revealed an increase in malaria prevalence in Franceville between 2017-2019. The global clinical cases was 26.1% (658/2015). Children under 5 years (44.0%) and patients aged 5-14 years (40.1%) were more affected than patients aged ≥15 years (18.8%, P=0.0001). Malaria infection was also significantly dependent on season and gender. We observed at least three Plasmodium species and the predominant Plasmodium species was P. falciparum 80.0%, followed by P. ovale (19.5%) and P. malariae (17.8%).

Conclusion: Our study showed that malaria remains a public health priority for the population of Franceville and that the prevalence of clinical cases of malaria at the laboratory decrease between 2017 and 2019. Our results highlight the need for strategies to control malaria in Franceville, adapted to epidemiological contexts and environmental constraint.


Keywords

Malaria prevalence; Diversity; Sex; Age; Season; Gabon

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Crossref Citations

1. Epidemiology of malaria in Gabon: A systematic review and meta-analysis from 1980 to 2023
Yann Vital Sima-Biyang, Steede Seinnat Ontoua, Neil Michel Longo-Pendy, Clark Mbou-Boutambe, Patrice Makouloutou-Nzassi, Cyr Kinga Moussadji, Jean-Bernard Lekana-Douki, Larson Boundenga
Journal of Infection and Public Health  vol: 17  issue: 7  first page: 102459  year: 2024  
doi: 10.1016/j.jiph.2024.05.047