Original Research

Profiles of microorganisms isolated from neonates’ blood cultures, incubators, cradles, ventilators, washbasins, and health-workers of Libreville University Hospital Neonatal Service: focus on infection prevention and control measures

Eliane K. Kamgaing, Jean-Charles Ndong, Léonard K. Rerambiah, Joel F.D. Siawaya
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 12, No 1 | a333 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2021.1075 | © 2024 Eliane K. Kamgaing, Jean-Charles Ndong, Léonard K. Rerambiah, Joel F.D. Siawaya | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 April 2024 | Published: 18 June 2021

About the author(s)

Eliane K. Kamgaing, Pôle enfant, CHU- Mère-Enfant Fondation Jeanne EBORI, Libreville; and, Department of Pediatric University of Health Sciences, Owendo
Jean-Charles Ndong, Service Laboratoire, CHU- Mère-Enfant, Fondation Jeanne EBORI, Libreville, Gabon
Léonard K. Rerambiah, Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, Libreville; and, Service Laboratoire, CHU de Libreville, Gabon
Joel F.D. Siawaya, Service Laboratoire, CHU- Mère-Enfant, Fondation Jeanne EBORI, Libreville; and, Laboratoire National de Santé Publique, Libreville, Gabon

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Abstract

Background: Nosocomial infection outbreaks in neonatal services are a serious healthcare concern in both developed and developing countries, but few studies have been conducted in sub-Saharan Africa.

Objective: This study explored the etiology of septicemia in neonates and associated patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility in Gabon.

Methods: We analyzed cultures from neonates’ blood and swabs from medical personnel and equipment located in the neonatology service.

Results: Sixty-eight microorganisms were isolated from the medical personnel and equipment; 46 microorganisms were isolated from neonates’ blood culture. Klebsiella pneumoniae spp pneumoniae was the most common bacteria found in both (30.6% and 26.9%, respectively). All Klebsiella pneumoniae spp pneumonia isolates were resistant to amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, gentamycin resistance ranged from 93% to 100%, and cephalosporin resistance ranged from 33.3% to 47%.

Conclusions: Awareness of the etiology, prevalence, and outcome of nosocomial infection is the first and most important step to appropriate interventions


Keywords

Neonates; healthcare-associated infections; resistance

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