Original Research

Factors associated with people's satisfaction with their sex life: a survey conducted in Kinshasa (Democratic Republic of Congo) during the COVID-19 pandemic

Kayonda Hubert Ngamaba, Laddy Sedzo Lombo, Israël Kenda Makopa
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 13, No 4 | a416 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2022.2069 | © 2024 Kayonda Hubert Ngamaba, Laddy Sedzo Lombo, Israël Kenda Makopa | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 10 April 2024 | Published: 31 December 2022

About the author(s)

Kayonda Hubert Ngamaba, International Centre for Mental Health Social Research, School for Business and Society, University of York, York, United Kingdom
Laddy Sedzo Lombo, Centre Spécialisé dans la Prise en charge Psychosociale en Santé Mentale (CSPEMRDC), Université Chrétienne de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo
Israël Kenda Makopa, Centre Spécialisé dans la Prise en charge Psychosociale en Santé Mentale (CSPEMRDC), Université Chrétienne de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, Congo

Abstract

Background: COVID-19’s restrictive measures have significantly affected our health, work and social relationships. As yet, less attention has been given to the changes in sex life.

Aim: This study investigates people’s satisfaction with sex life in Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC).

Methods: A cross-sectional survey of the general population (18 years and over) was conducted, from 1st to 18th July 2020, in 17 municipalities in Kinshasa and several measures were used: Quality of life MANSA, EQ-5D-3L, UCLA Loneliness; PHQ-9; GAD-7. Prior to conducting data analysis, diagnostic tests for our data were performed to assess distribution, variance and multicollinearity. Descriptive statistics, bivariate correlation and multiple regression analysis were used.

Results: Sex life satisfaction increases from young adults aged 18- 35 to those aged 36-55 and then there is a decrease from ages 56-69. After controlling for socio-demographic factors, sex life satisfaction was positively associated with the number and quality of people’s friendships (B=0.30, p=0.01) and people’s relationships with their families (B=0.32, p=0.03). People who feel lonely have lower sex life satisfaction (B=-0.15, p=0.01).

Conclusion: People’s quality of their friendships and family relationships are important for their sexual well-being. Healthcare providers and policymakers should consider people’s quality of friendships and family relationships when planning to improve the sexual well-being of people in DRC.


Keywords

sex life satisfaction; sexual health; friendships; loneliness; anxiety and depression

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