Original Research

Restoring non-COVID-19 clinical research and surveillance in Oyo state, Nigeria during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic

Veronica O. Ogunleye, Okainemen P. Oluwalusi, Oluwafemi Popoola, Aderemi Kehinde, Olukemi Adekanmbi, Ifiok Udofia, Sarah Agbi, Ifeoluwa Akintayo, Jolaade J. Ajiboye, Folasade Bamidele, Temitope Alonge, Ondari D. Mogeni, Florian Marks, Iruka N. Okeke
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 13, No 3 | a430 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2022.1720 | © 2024 Veronica O. Ogunleye, Okainemen P. Oluwalusi, Oluwafemi Popoola, Aderemi Kehinde, Olukemi Adekanmbi, Ifiok Udofia, Sarah Agbi, Ifeoluwa Akintayo, Jolaade J. Ajiboye, Folasade Bamidele, Temitope Alonge, Ondari D. Mogeni, Florian Marks, Iruka N. Okeke | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 11 April 2024 | Published: 07 September 2022

About the author(s)

Veronica O. Ogunleye, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Okainemen P. Oluwalusi, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Oluwafemi Popoola, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria; Department of Community Medicine, Clinical Sciences, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Aderemi Kehinde, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Olukemi Adekanmbi, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria; Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ifiok Udofia, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Sarah Agbi, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ifeoluwa Akintayo, Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Jolaade J. Ajiboye, Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Folasade Bamidele, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria; Infectious Disease Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria
Temitope Alonge, University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria; Oyo State Government, COVID-19 Task Force, Ibadan, Nigeria; Department of Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria
Ondari D. Mogeni, International Vaccine Institute, Seoul, Korea, Republic of
Florian Marks, International Vaccine Institute Seoul, Korea; Cambridge Institute of Therapeutic Immunology and Infectious Disease, University of Cambridge School of Medicine, UK; Madagascr Institute for Vaccine Research, University of Antananarivo, Madagascar; Institute of Global Health, University of Heidelberg, Germany
Iruka N. Okeke, Severe Typhoid in Africa Project, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Nigeria; Department of Pharmaceutical Microbiology, Pharmacy, University of Ibadan, Nigeria

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Abstract

Background: Many sub-Saharan African patients receive clinical care from extramurally-supported research and surveillance. During the COVID-19 pandemic, pausing these activities reduces patient care, surveillance, and research staff employment, increasing pandemic losses. In Oyo State, Nigeria, we paused a multi-country invasive salmonellosis surveillance initiative and a rural clinical bacteriology project.

Objective: Working with research partners raises health facility concerns about SARS-CoV-2 transmission risks and incurs infection prevention costs, so we developed and implemented re-opening plans to protect staff and patients and help health facilities deliver care.

Methods: Our reopening plan included appointing safety and personal protective equipment (PPE) managers from existing project staff cadres, writing new standard operating procedures, implementing extensive assessed training, COVID-19 testing for staff, procuring and managing PPE, and providing secondary bacteraemia blood culture support for COVID-19 patients in State isolation facilities.

Results:  Surveillance data showed that the pandemic reduced care access and negatively affected patient unsupervised antibacterial use. The re-opening plan repurposed human and material resources from national and international extramurally-supported programs to mitigate these effects on public health.

Conclusions:  A structured reopening plan restarted care, surveillance, and infection prevention and control.


Keywords

Essential services; Blood culture; COVID-19; Surveillance

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