Original Research

Induction of labour practices at Botshabelo District Hospital: Assessing the institutional guidelines

Matthew O.A. Benedict, Hanneke Brits
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 13, No 2 | a471 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2022.2153 | © 2024 Matthew O.A. Benedict, Hanneke Brits | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 11 April 2024 | Published: 26 July 2022

About the author(s)

Matthew O.A. Benedict, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Hanneke Brits, Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa

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Abstract

Induction of labour (IOL) is defined as an artificial stimulation administered to initiate the delivery process before the onset of spontaneous labour. Setting-adapted guidelines need to be developed to promote safe maternal and neonatal care in line with the needs of a specific institution. This study aimed to describe and assess the current IOL practices at Botshabelo District Hospital, focusing on incidence, indications, induction methods, complications, and outcomes. A retrospective-descriptive study included all relevant data from IOL cases over six months between July and December 2017. From 168 attempted inductions of labour, 153 files were retrieved. The majority of cases (69.7%) were for post-dates. Normal vaginal delivery (NVD) was achieved in most patients (69.3%), while one patient had an assisted delivery. Thus, 30.1% of inductions failed and required caesarean sections. The incidence, indications, methods of induction, complications, and outcomes of IOL in BDH are in line with international guidelines; however, including the sweeping of membranes at term and balloon catheters as methods could improve the current guidelines.


Keywords

Induction of labour; practices; institution; guidelines; setting adapted

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