Original Article

Predictors of HIV stigma among health workers in the Cape Coast metropolis, Ghana

James Prah, Anna Hayfron-Benjamin, Mohammed Abdulai, Obed Lasim, Yvonne Nartey, Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 11, No 1 | a536 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2020.1020 | © 2024 James Prah, Anna Hayfron-Benjamin, Mohammed Abdulai, Obed Lasim, Yvonne Nartey, Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 April 2024 | Published: 29 April 2020

About the author(s)

James Prah, University Hospital of Cape Coast, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Anna Hayfron-Benjamin, Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, College of Health and Allied Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Mohammed Abdulai, University Hospital of Cape Coast, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Obed Lasim, Department of Health Information Management, College of Health and Allied Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana
Yvonne Nartey, Department of Internal Medicine, Cape Coast Teaching Hospital, Cape Coast, Ghana
Dorcas Obiri-Yeboah, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medical Sciences, College of Health & Allied Sciences, University of Cape Coast, Ghana

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Abstract

Stigma against people living with HIV (PLHIV) among health workers remains a barrier to the provision of needed care to HIV patients worldwide. We sought to investigate predictors of HIV stigma among health workers in Cape Coast, Ghana. This was a cross sectional study conducted in three hospitals from November 2016 to February 2017. The study made use of a pre-existing self-administered questionnaire. Multiple regression analysis and Pearson’s coefficient tests were performed to determine the relationship between the dependent variable, i.e. the stigmatized attitudes of health workers, and some independent variables, and to determine which of the independent variables predict stigma amongst health care workers. A total of 331 health workers of different categories participated. Respondents’ personal opinions on HIV, fears/worries of getting infected and category of staff {F(3,327)= 23.934 P<0.00}, R2 = 0.180) significantly predicted their stigmatizing behaviour. Compared to other health workers, nurses had higher scores for stigmatizing behaviour. The study found evidence of discriminatory and stigmatizing behaviour towards PLHIV by health workers. Stigma reduction programmes aimed at health workers should be strengthened at all health facilities that provide care to PLHIV.

Keywords

stigma; discrimination; PLHIV; Cape Coast; Ghana

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Crossref Citations

1. HIV destigmatization: perspectives of people living with HIV in the Kumasi Metropolis in Ghana
Elizabeth Armstrong-Mensah, Emmanuel Ofori, Ernest Alema-Mensah, Thomas Agyarko-Poku
Frontiers in Reproductive Health  vol: 5  year: 2023  
doi: 10.3389/frph.2023.1169216