Original Article

Factors contributing to changes in contraceptive use among adolescent girls in Zambia: a decomposition analysis

Mumbi Chola, Khumbulani Hlongwana, Themba G. Ginindza
Journal of Public Health in Africa | Vol 14, No 9 | a90 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4081/jphia.2023.2261 | © 2024 Mumbi Chola, Khumbulani Hlongwana, Themba G. Ginindza | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 03 April 2024 | Published: 30 September 2023

About the author(s)

Mumbi Chola, Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; and Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, School of Public Health, University of Zambia, Lusaka, Zambia
Khumbulani Hlongwana, Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; and Cancer & Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Research Unit (CIDERU), College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Themba G. Ginindza, Department of Public Health Medicine, School of Nursing and Public Health, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; and Cancer & Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Research Unit (CIDERU), College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

Abstract

Despite its documented benefits, contraceptive use among adolescents remains low, particularly in low-and middle-income countries. This study aimed to decompose the main factors contributing to the changes in contraceptive use among adolescent girls in Zambia over the period 1996 to 2014. Data on adolescent girls aged 15-19 years from Zambia Demographic and Health Survey data were analysed using multivariate decomposition analysis of change. Stata 15/MP (Stata-Corp LLC) was used for analysis, at a 95% confidence level. A p-value of 0.05 was used to determine statistical significance. The sample included 9,072 adolescent girls. Contraceptive use increased by 3% from 7.6% in 1996 to 10.6% in 2013/14. Change in modern contraceptive use among adolescents was mainly due to differences in coefficients (changes in population behaviour). Increases in age contributed to the change in contraceptive use, resulting in 2.94% and 9.33% increases for 17- and 18-year-olds respectively. Marriage or living with a partner contributed the largest change (44%) while living in a rural area accounted for approximately 20%. Interventions targeting improving contraceptive use in adolescents should be responsive to the needs of various age groups, places of residence, and educational levels for maximum benefits.


Keywords

factors; contraceptive use; adolescent girls; decomposition; Zambia

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